If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right. Switch to Accessible Site
Glen Allen  (804) 934-9340
Farmville
Monday, 29 June 2020 00:00

Do you suffer from heel pain when you get up in the morning?

Monday, 29 June 2020 00:00

A broken ankle is a fracture that occurs in the tibia, fibia, or the talus, which is the bone that connects the leg to the heel.  While broken ankles are usually caused by a twisting or turning motion, stress fractures can occur when the legs and feet are overused.  While there are many types of unique fractures, there are four that are most common. The bimalleolar ankle fracture occurs when the knob on the inside of the ankle is fractured. A trimalleolar fracture involves the medial (inside), lateral (outside), and posterior (back) malleoli all breaking.  Medical malleous ankle fractures occur in the lower portion of the tibia, and a pilon fracture occurs on the weight bearing roof of the ankle. Fractures can also be displaced, meaning bones are out of their normal alignment, or non displaced, which are bones that are aligned but still broken. While these are the most common fractures, each break is unique, so it is important to consult with a podiatrist for more detailed information about your injury and a treatment plan towards recovery. 

Broken ankles need immediate treatment. If you are seeking treatment, contact one of our podiatrists from New Age Foot & Ankle Surgery. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet. 

Broken Ankles
A broken ankle is experienced when a person fractures their tibia or fibula in the lower leg and ankle area. Both of these bones are attached at the bottom of the leg and combine to form what we know to be our ankle.

When a physician is referring to a break of the ankle, he or she is usually referring to a break in the area where the tibia and fibula are joined to create our ankle joint. Ankles are more prone to fractures because the ankle is an area that suffers a lot of pressure and stress. There are some obvious signs when a person experiences a fractured ankle, and the following symptoms may be present.

Symptoms of a Fractured Ankle

  • Excessive pain when the area is touched or when any pressure is placed on the ankle
  •  Swelling around the area
  •  Bruising of the area
  • Area appears to be deformed

If you suspect an ankle fracture, it is recommended to seek treatment as soon as possible. The sooner you have your podiatrist diagnose the fracture, the quicker you’ll be on the way towards recovery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Glen Allen and Farmville, VA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about All About Broken Ankle
Monday, 22 June 2020 00:00

There are five elongated bones that are located in the feet which are known as the metatarsal bones. These bones absorb the impact that occurs as walking and running are done, and as a result, can become fractured. Stress fractures are considered to be hairline fractures and can happen when repetitive activities are frequently performed. Common symptoms of stress fractures include pain, swelling, and bruising. It is beneficial to avoid putting weight on the affected foot as the healing process takes place. It can occur as a result of a sudden change in running, or from eating foods that have insufficient nutrients. The average recovery time is approximately six to eight weeks, and it may help to gradually return to high impact activities. If you are suffering from a stress fracture, it is suggested that you speak with a podiatrist who can determine what the best treatment option is for you.

Stress fractures occur when there is a tiny crack within a bone. To learn more, contact one of our podiatrists from New Age Foot & Ankle Surgery. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain free and on your feet.

How Are They Caused?

Stress fractures are the result of repetitive force being placed on the bone. Since the lower leg and feet often carry most of the body’s weight, stress fractures are likely to occur in these areas. If you rush into a new exercise, you are more likely to develop a stress fracture since you are starting too much, too soon.  Pain resulting from stress fractures may go unnoticed at first, however it may start to worsen over time.

Risk Factors

  • Gender – They are more commonly found in women compared to men.
  • Foot Problems – People with unusual arches in their feet are more likely to develop stress fractures.
  • Certain Sports – Dancers, gymnasts, tennis players, runners, and basketball players are more likely to develop stress fractures.
  • Lack of Nutrients – A lack of vitamin D and calcium may weaken the bones and make you more prone to stress fractures
  • Weak Bones – Osteoporosis can weaken the bones therefore resulting in stress fractures

Stress fractures do not always heal properly, so it is important that you seek help from a podiatrist if you suspect you may have one. Ignoring your stress fracture may cause it to worsen, and you may develop chronic pain as well as additional fractures.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Glen Allen and Farmville, VA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle
Monday, 15 June 2020 00:00

The condition that is known as an ingrown toenail can cause severe pain and discomfort. It occurs as a result of the side of the nail on the big toe growing into the outer edges of the skin. It can happen from trimming the nail incorrectly, or from wearing shoes that do not have ample room for the toes to move freely in. One of the first symptoms that is noticed can be slight swelling and redness on the side of the nail. If this is not treated promptly, it can become infected, and a discharge may ooze from the impacted area. Some patients have found mild relief when the foot is soaked in warm water. This may help the skin surrounding the ingrown toenail to soften, which may make it easier to gently pull the nail away from the skin. If you have developed an ingrown toenail, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can perform the best treatment for this ailment.

Ingrown toenails can become painful if they are not treated properly. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact one of our podiatrists of New Age Foot & Ankle Surgery. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails occur when a toenail grows sideways into the bed of the nail, causing pain, swelling, and possibly infection.

Causes

  • Bacterial infections
  • Improper nail cutting such as cutting it too short or not straight across
  • Trauma to the toe, such as stubbing, which causes the nail to grow back irregularly
  • Ill-fitting shoes that bunch the toes too close together
  • Genetic predisposition

Prevention

Because ingrown toenails are not something found outside of shoe-wearing cultures, going barefoot as often as possible will decrease the likeliness of developing ingrown toenails. Wearing proper fitting shoes and using proper cutting techniques will also help decrease your risk of developing ingrown toenails.

Treatment

Ingrown toenails are a very treatable foot condition. In minor cases, soaking the affected area in salt or antibacterial soaps will not only help with the ingrown nail itself, but also help prevent any infections from occurring. In more severe cases, surgery is an option. In either case, speaking to your podiatrist about this condition will help you get a better understanding of specific treatment options that are right for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Glen Allen and Farmville, VA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Ingrown Toenail Care

Connect with us
facebook twitter blog
featured articles

Copyright © New Age Foot & Ankle Surgery | Site Map | Nondiscrimination | Design by: Podiatry Content Connection